Zhang, Owen (1456) - Zimmerle, Wayne (1648)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/03/2017

Round 5 [Murrel]


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.f4 The Sicilian Grand Prix Attack
3...e6 4.Nf3 a6 5.a4 required if White wants to play Bc4.
[A frequently played alternative is
5.g3 followed by fianchettoing the f1-Bishop aiming at d5.]
5...b6
[Black had an opportunity to play the freeing move
5...d5 which is no longer available after Bc4.]
6.Bc4 Bb7 7.O-O Nd4 8.d3 h5 9.Nxd4
[while the capture is OK but I much prefer
9.Be3 completing development. if
9...Nxf3+ 10.Qxf3 develops the Queen while playing additional pressure on d5 and f7.There is an old saying "to take is a mistake" which means that the recapture usually brings a piece forward into play.]
9...cxd4 10.Ne2 Bc5 11.Kh1 is too passive and tosses away an opening advantage, In this position the King is safer on g1 than h1 because the c5-Bishop is blocked by a pawn that White controls while Black controls the possible opening of the b7-h1 diagonal with the potential lever of f5.
[11.Qe1 with Qg3 attacking g7]
[11.Bd2 developing the last minor piece]
[and 11.f5 opening lines on the Black King are all better alternatives.]
11...h4 12.Ng1
[12.h3 stops Black's initiative against the King.]
12...Qf6
[Black misses a chance to break open the White center to advantage of the b7-Bishop.
12...d5]
13.Qg4
[13.f5 would open Black's center for his f1-Rook.
13...e5 would be met by
14.Nh3 threatening Bg5.]
13...Nh6 14.Qg5 O-O-O 15.Nh3 Rdg8 16.a5 b5? missing the watchful eye of the Queen.
17.Qxc5+ Bc6 18.Bb3
[I liked the attack with
18.Bxb5 axb5 19.a6 but Fritz agrees with Owen.]
18...g6 19.Qg5 White is a piece ahead and so wants to trade Queens.
19...Qg7 20.Qxh4 removing the Black pawn opens the line to the King and is dangerous.
20...f6 21.Qg3 Nf7 22.c3 dxc3 23.Re1 just recapturing and advancing the pawns on the Black King would be better.White is playing on the side of the board where Black is strongest instead of playing against Black's weaknesses.
23...f5 24.e5 Rh5 Black wants to double or triple on the h-file where the Knight and pawn are pinned.
25.Ng5 Kg1 unpinning or even d4-d5 would be better plans.
25...Rgh8 The h-pawn is now toast and cannot be saved.Nf3 seems White's best hope to survive a now boiling attack.
26.h3? forgetting that the g2-pawn is pinned and now White must give up his Queen for a Rook and Black has regained the position with a strong attack.
26...Nxg5 27.fxg5 Rxh3+ 28.Qxh3 Rxh3+ 29.Kg1 Rxd3 30.Bc2 cxb2 31.Bxb2 White's Queen Bishop and Queen Rook finally enter the game.
31...Rd2 32.Rac1 Rxg2+ 33.Kf1 Qh7 34.Bd4 Qh1+ 35.Bg1 Qxg1#


0-1

Leali, Mike (1863) - Zimmerle, Wayne (1648)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/10/2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.e4 e6 2.f4 Not your usual French Defense!
2...b6 3.d4 Bb7 4.Bd3 Nf6 5.Qe2 Nc6 6.c3 Qe7 7.Nf3 O-O-O 8.a4 d5 9.e5 Ne4 10.Nbd2
[The e-pawn is poisoned.
10.Bxe4 dxe4 11.Qxe4 Nxd4 should win for Black.]
10...Nxd2 11.Bxd2 f6 12.b4 Castling on the opposite sides usually leads to pawn storms where the first to attack the opponent's King will win.But here the weather is calm on the King side of the board.
12...fxe5 13.fxe5 h6 Bg5 skewering the Queen to the Rook was threatened.
14.a5 Kb8 15.axb6 Also available to White is a6 or Bg6 both of which delay the Q-side exchange for a move but cramp Black's ability to find good moves.
15...cxb6 16.O-O g5 Black starts his counter-punch. The value of the missed Bg6 is now apparent.
17.Ne1 I like the idea of Ne1-c2-a3-b5
17...Rd7 18.Qg4 stalling Black's push back.
18...Bg7 19.Bg6 Rf8 20.Nd3 Rxf1+
[Backtracking with the Rook
20...Rdd8 seems preferable to given White control of the only open file]
21.Rxf1 Nd8 22.Qh5 Bc8
[22...Rc7]
23.h4 gxh4 24.Bxh6
[24.Be1 and recapturing the h4-pawn keeps the attack rolling a little better as there are more attacking pieces on the board.]
24...Bxh6 25.Qxh6 These exchanges have returned the game to even according to Fritz.
25...Qg7 26.Qg5 Nf7
[26...Ba6]
27.Qf6 Nd8 28.Nf4 Qxf6 29.exf6 Rc7 30.Rf3 Nf7? the losing move.
31.Bxf7 Rxf7 Black was already constrained by the presence of the passed pawn, but these exchange assures that Black must part with material to stop it.
32.Ng6 Kc7 33.Ne5 Rf8 34.f7 h3 35.gxh3 Ba6 36.Ng6 Be2 37.Nxf8 Bxf3 38.Nxe6+


1-0

Crum, Randy (1500) - Sye, David (1748)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/10/2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 After faking a NimzoIndian Black settles on the Modern Benoni
4.d5 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 g6 7.Bb5+ Nbd7 8.Bg5 a6 9.Bxd7+ Bxd7 10.Nge2 h6 11.Bd2
[11.Bf4 is better.Every move should have a touch of poison - that is, every move should have a threat.If White's Bishop is on f4, Black will find it harder to fianchetto his K-Bishop.The move played lacks a threat.]
11...b5 12.Ng3 Bg7 13.O-O O-O 14.Bf4 Qb6 15.Qd2 Kh7 16.h3 Rfe8 17.Rae1
[Wrong Rook.
17.f3 is fine since c4+ is no threat as Black answers with Be3 Black wants to play b4, not c4, and so playing c4 actually hinders his progress.]
17...b4 18.Na4 Ooops this is not helpful!
18...Bxa4 19.e5 dxe5 20.Bxe5
[20.Rxe5 to make room on e8 for the f8-Rook]
20...Bb5 21.Bxf6 Qxf6 22.Rxe8 Rxe8 23.Re1
[23.Rc1 is needed.White should not trade pieces when behind materially.]
23...Rxe1+ 24.Qxe1 Qxb2 25.d6 Qa1 26.Qxa1 Bxa1 27.Ne4 Bd4 A competitive game until the loose pieces dropped off.


0-1

Zhang, Owen (1456) - Liu, Lawrence (1773)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/10/2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Be7 Hungarian Defense
4.O-O is the book move here.Castling is a good alternative.
4...Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.h3 O-O 7.d3 h6
[7...Na5]
8.Be3 a6 9.a4 Bd7 10.d4 b6 11.dxe5 Releasing the tension.White is slightly better and so should try to build an attack.
11...Nxe5 12.Nxe5 dxe5 13.Qe2 a5 14.Rad1 Qc8 15.Nd5 Re8 16.Qd2
[Giving away the a-pawn.White has many ways to save the pawn.Bb3 certainly works, but White could also play
16.Qf3 Bxa4 17.Bxh6! with an attack.
17...gxh6 18.Nxf6+ Bxf6 19.Qxf6 with Rd3 & Rg3 to follow.]
16...Bxa4 17.Nxf6+ Bxf6 18.Qd5 Rf8 19.b3 Be8 20.Qd2
[White should grab the initiative with
20.f4! exf4 21.e5!]
20...Bc6 21.Bd5 Qb7 22.Qe2 Rfd8 23.Bxc6 Qxc6 This exchange of pieces brings Black's Queen into the game, menacing White's pawns.
24.Qg4 Be7 25.Qg3 This move has to be a mistake.White drops at least 1 more pawn and his attack on g7 can be easily handled by Bf8.
25...Rxd1 26.Rxd1 Qf6
[Black is a pawn ahead and so wishes to trade off the Queens, but after
26...Qxc2 27.Rd7 Bf8 Black continues to munch pawns.]
27.Rd7 Bd6 Trapping the Rook.
28.h4 a4 29.bxa4 Rxa4 30.Qg4 Rc4 31.Qe2
[31.Qd1 with the threat of Bxb6 cxb6 Rxd6]
31...Rxe4 32.Qb5
[32.g3]
32...Rb4 33.Qc6 e4
[This zwischenzug is not needed.
33...Rb1+ 34.Kh2 Qxh4# is mate.]
34.g3 Rb1+ 35.Kg2 Qf3+ 36.Kh3 Rh1#

0-1

Leali, Mike (1863) - Lonn, Adam (1580)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/24/2017

Round 2 [Murrel]


1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 This is the Exchange Variation of the Caro Kann. Other more common lines are 3.e5 and 3.Nc3,
3...cxd5 4.Nf3
[4.c4 transposes into the famed and feared Botvinnik-Panov Attack!]
4...Bg4 Knights before Bishops with either Nc6 or Nf6 is more usual here.
5.Be2 e6 6.O-O Bd6 7.h3 Bh5 8.Re1 Nf6 9.c3 O-O The opening has been pretty quiet and pretty even.
10.Ne5 an effort to liven things up before a draw sets in.
10...Bxe2 11.Rxe2 An unusual choice. Qxe2 seems more natural. Rooks usually need to unite on the back rank for defense of the King.
11...Qc7 12.Nd3 Nc6 13.Nd2 b5 14.a3 Nd2-b3-c5 creating a strong point with the c5-Knight Outpost is a good alternative.
14...a5 15.Nf3 b4 16.axb4 axb4 17.Rxa8 Rxa8 18.cxb4 Nxb4 19.Nxb4 Bxb4 This exchange creates an outside passed pawn for White, but it also creates a weak isolated Queen Pawn in the center.
20.Rc2 Qb6 21.Qd3 h6 22.g3 Ne4 23.Kg2 Be7 24.Nd2 Nd6 25.Nf3 Bf6 26.Be3 Ra4 There has been a lot of maneuvering with little consequence.
27.Ne5
[Perhaps White should try
27.Rc3 hoping to tempt Black with the pawn offer.
27...Qxb2 28.Rb3 threatening both the Queen and checkmate!]
27...Qb7 28.f3 Rb4! 29.Qc3 Rb3 30.Qd2?
[A blunder dropping a piece and more.
30.Qc6 keeps the game afloat.]
30...Bxe5 31.dxe5 Nc4

0-1

Garrett, Daniel (1817) - Zhang, Owen (1456)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/24/2017

Round 2 [Murrel]


1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 Nf6 The Reti Gambit Declined. More common is just c6 or e6, reinforcing the center. Black can then wait for White to fianchetto his KB before playing dxc4.
3.cxd5 Nxd5 4.e4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 This move is not usually good in c4 or d4 games as the c-pawn needs to be played out to c5 or c6
6.d4 And White owns the center with a pair of center pawns which threaten to advance against the defenseless Knights.
6...Bg4 with c6 & d6 unavailable here Black should play e6.
7.Be3
[White misses a Queen sacrifice with
7.d5! Ne5 8.Nxe5 Bxd1 9.Bb5+ c6 10.dxc6 a6 11.c7+ axb5 12.cxd8=Q+ Rxd8 13.Nxd1 and White is a piece and Black is still undeveloped.]
7...e6 8.a3 a6 9.Be2 Bxf3 10.Bxf3 This exchange helped White. Black should develop with Qd7.
10...e5? Be7 & castles are needed.
11.d5 Ne7 12.O-O Ng6 13.g3 Bd6 14.Bg2 Qd7 15.h3 h5 16.f4 h4 17.f5 Ne7 18.g4 The pawn play by both sides here has been excellent.
18...c6 But the board has changed. Now Black should continue with Q-siide castling and so the text is incorrect.
19.Bg5
[White could also play to take advantage of the newly weak dark squares with
19.Na4]
19...cxd5 20.Bxf6 gxf6 21.Nxd5 Bc5+ 22.Kh1 Nxd5 23.exd5 Qd6
[23...Bd4]
24.Qb3 Bb6 25.Rac1 Ke7 26.Rc2 Rhc8 27.Rfc1 Kd8 28.Rc6 bxc6 29.Qxb6+ Qc7 30.Qf2 Qd6
[30...Qa7 31.Qxh4 cxd5 32.Re1 Rab8 33.Qxf6+ Qe7 34.Qxa6 Rxb2 35.Bxd5 Rcc2 and all White has is a perpetual check beginning with
36.Qa8+ Kd7 37.Qa4+ Kd8 38.Qa8+ etc.]
31.dxc6 Ke7
[31...Rab8!]
32.c7
[The line after 32.c7 was reviewed heavily during the post game analysis. Wayne suggest Rab8 which almost holds. But Rc6 saves the day for White. and Black can't stop the carnage after
32.Qf1 Kh2 Rb7 Qxh4 and Qxf6 will be fatal.]
32...Qd4 33.Qxd4 exd4 34.Bxa8 Rxa8 35.c8=Q Rxc8 36.Rxc8 and the game is essentially over.
36...Kd6 37.Kg2 Ke5 38.Kf3 a5 39.Rc5+ Kd6 40.Rxa5 d3 41.Ke3 Kc6 42.Kxd3 Kb6 43.b4 Kc6 44.Ra6+ Kb5 45.Rxf6 Ka4 46.Ra6+ Kb5 47.Ra5+ Kb6 48.Ke4 f6 49.Kd5 Kc7 50.Ke6 Kc6 51.Kxf6 Kd7 52.Kg7 Ke7 53.Ra6 Ke8 54.Ra7 Kd8 55.f6 Kc8 56.f7 Kb8 57.Re7 Kc8 58.f8=Q#


1-0

Suarez, Ron (1533) - Taylor, Tom (1820)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/10/2017

Round 1 [lichess.org]


1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Nf3 A27 English Opening: King's English Variation, Three Knights System
3...g6 4.d4 exd4 5.Nxd4 Bg7 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Qc2 Ne7 8.g3 O-O 9.Bg2 Rb8 10.O-O The opening phase seems over. Both fianchettoed Bishops are good. Black has more center pawns and will try to play d5. The game should be even.
10...Bb7 11.Be3 a6 12.Rfd1 Nf5 13.Bc1 Qe7 14.e3 Rfd8 15.Rb1 Qe5 16.Ne2 d6 17.b4 c5 18.Bxb7 Rxb7 19.Bb2 Qe7 20.Bxg7 Kxg7 21.bxc5 Rxb1 22.Qxb1 dxc5 23.Qb2+ Kg8 24.Rc1? (0.11 > -1.07) Mistake. Best move was Rxd8+.
[24.Rxd8+ Qxd8 25.Nc3 Nd6 26.Qb3 Kg7 27.Nd5 c6 28.Qc3+ f6 29.Nf4 Qd7 30.Qc2 Kf7]
24...Nxe3 25.Qc3?! (-0.94 > -1.51) Inaccuracy. Best move was Nf4.
[25.Nf4 Nd1]
[25.fxe3 Qxe3+ 26.Kf1 Rd2 27.Qb8+ Kg7 28.Re1 Qf3+ 29.Kg1 Rxe2 Qxe2 30.Qb3 and Black should win. However, White still has play. QvQ games often draw regardless of pawn count.]
25...Nf5 26.Re1 Qd6? (-1.61 > -0.49) Mistake.Best move was Nd4.
[Correct is
26...Nd4 27.Nxd4 cxd4 28.Qd2 Qd6 and Black is winning.]
27.Nf4 Qd2?? (-0.76 > 6.60) Blunder.Best move was Qd4.
[27...Qd4 28.Qb3 Qd2 29.Rf1 Qa5 30.Qb7 Qb6 31.Qe4 Rd4 32.Qe8+ Kg7 33.Qe5+ Qf6 34.Qxc5]
28.Re8+ Removing the Defender and winning the Queen! Black resigns.


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